Jupiter, all night long

The ‘King of the Planets’, Jupiter, is just days passed its January 5th opposition. Observers can easily spot it as the brightest star in the sky as it becomes visible in the northeast sky right after darkfall. By midnight, Jupiter is riding high nearly overhead. Early risers will notice the planet very low in the northwest just before the start of dawn.

Last weekend I was using at the Vatican Observatory 1.8-m VATT telescope on Mount Graham to observe comets and asteroids. For fun, I spent a little time observing Jupiter…

Jupiter from the VATT 1.8-m on January 13, 2014 UT. Note, the 'Great Red Spot' is visible. Credit: Carl Hergenrother, Vatican Observatory, University of Arizona.

Jupiter (and Ganymede) from the VATT 1.8-m on January 11, 2014 UT. Credit: Carl Hergenrother, Vatican Observatory, University of Arizona.

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Jupiter from the VATT 1.8-m on January 13, 2014 UT. Note, the 'Great Red Spot' is visible. Credit: Carl Hergenrother, Vatican Observatory, University of Arizona.

Jupiter from the VATT 1.8-m on January 13, 2014 UT. Note, Io and its shadow are in transit across the face of Jupiter. Credit: Carl Hergenrother, Vatican Observatory, University of Arizona.

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Jupiter from the VATT 1.8-m on January 13, 2014 UT. Note, the 'Great Red Spot' is visible. Credit: Carl Hergenrother, Vatican Observatory, University of Arizona.

Jupiter from the VATT 1.8-m on January 13, 2014 UT. Note, the ‘Great Red Spot’ is visible. Credit: Carl Hergenrother, Vatican Observatory, University of Arizona.

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About Carl Hergenrother
I am a professional astronomer specializing in the study of comets, asteroids and meteors. This blog will focus on my professional and amateur work in this field

One Response to Jupiter, all night long

  1. Pingback: Bright Stars in the Sky | The Transient Sky - Comets, Asteroids, Meteors

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